Churches Attract New Members With Beer [NPR]

SpoonFed: Via NPR

 

Leah Stanfield stands at a microphone across the room from the beer taps and reads this evening’s gospel message.

She’s a 28-year-old leasing agent who’s been coming to Church-in-a-Pub here in Fort Worth, Tex., for a year, and occasionally leads worship.

“I find the love, I find the support, I find the non-judgmental eyes when I come here,” she says. “And I find friends that love God, love craft beer.”

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Every Sunday evening, 30 to 40 people gather at Zio Carlo brewpub to order pizza and pints of beer, to have fellowship, and have church — including communion.

Pastor Philip Heinze and his Calvary Lutheran Church sponsor Church-in-a-Pub, whose formal name is the Greek word, Kyrie. [...] read more

Audio available at Weekend Edition Sunday by 12:00 p.m ET

5 Things You Might Not Have Known About God And Beer

by DUSTIN DESOTO

This morning on Weekend Edition Sunday, NPR’s John Burnett describes how some churches are trying to attract new members by creating a different sort of Christian community around craft beer.

This is actually nothing new. For centuries, beer has brought people together to worship God. And God has inspired people to make beer. We’ve selected a few of the best examples:

  • In the early 17th century, the Paulaner monks in Germany would brew and drink a heavy, malty type of beer called Doppelbock for Lent. The Paulaner monks weren’t allowed to eat solid food for the duration of Lent, so the next best thing? Beer. The beer was so nutritious that it kept them nourished for the entire 40-day fast. The Paulaner Brewery in Munich still brews the Doppelbock beer today
  • Arthur Guinness, creator of Guinness beer, was a devout Christian who grew up in a time when drunkenness, mainly from liquor, was rampant. Brewing beer was safer than brewing liquor, and it was a well-respected profession. Monks had been brewing beer for ages, and Guinness decided to do it to give people in his community a less potent alternative to liquor. He used the teachings of God and applied it to his business. Author Stephen Mansfield told RELEVANT magazine, “The Guinness tale is not primarily about beer. It is not even primarily about the Guinnesses. It is about what God can do with a person who is willing and with a corporation committed to something noble and good in the world.” For more on the story of God and Guinness check out Mansfield’s book, The Search for God and Guinness. [...] read more
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